Eva Longoria Funds UCLA Study on Latinas and Education

Latina teens who are bilingual, have Hispanic teachers and counselors, and are involved in extracurricular activities have a stronger likelihood of attending college, a new study has found.

The report, “Making Education Work for Latinas in the U.S.,” was conducted by The Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at the University of California, Los Angeles, and commissioned by the actress Eva Longoria and her foundation.

Longoria’s foundation focuses on boosting education and entrepreneurship among Latinas. She hopes to use the report’s findings to better help Latinas.

Civil Rights Project co-director and education professor Patricia Gandara highlighted the importance of raising the education levels of Hispanic women.

“Latinas are the linchpin of the next generation — how a child fares in school is highly correlated with their mother’s education,” Gándara said in a news release. “If the cycle of under-education is to be broken for the Latino population, it will depend to a large extent on changing the fortunes of young women.”

Latinas benefit from involvement in extracurricular activities, which promote increased self-esteem. However, they face barriers to being more involved at school that include money, transportation issues, family needs and not feeling included.

The study shares that many Latinas enroll in non-selective two-year colleges because they are not aware of the greater opportunities at more selective four-year universities. Students who enroll in community college are less likely to graduate with degrees.

The paper includes the success stories of seven young Latinas. One of the young women recalled the influence of a Hispanic counselor.

“She was a person who really influenced me to want something more with my 
life because she would tell me that because I was a Latina that I would be stereotyped..you don’t want to prove people right,you want to prove them wrong! You want to be able to say ‘I’m Latina and I’m going to college and I’m furthering my education!”

Related Links:

“UCLA Study Funded by Eva Longoria IDs Factors That Improve Educational Outcomes for Latinas,” UCLA Newsroom.

“Making Education Work for Latinas in the U.S.,” The Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

The Eva Longoria Foundation

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Study Measures Stress Levels Among Hispanic Parents

Hispanic parents who are recent immigrants experience higher levels of stress than U.S.-born Hispanic parents and immigrant parents who have been in the United States for a longer period of time, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Overall, poor parents experience more stress than affluent parents. According to a news release, the findings were based on interviews with several thousand parents beginning one month after the birth of a child, and then at intervals until up to two years of age. Most of the parents were near or below the federal poverty level, defined as $23,550 for a family of four in 2013.

“The abundance of stress for poor parents is clear, potent and potentially toxic for them and their children,” said Chris Dunkel Schetter, a UCLA psychology professor and the study’s lead author. “Both mothers and fathers who were poor and members of an ethnic or racial minority group reported higher financial stress and more stress from major life events like death and divorce than those who were either just poor or just part of a minority group.”

According to the news release, stress was caused by issues such as parenting, finances, violence, deaths and racism. Stress was measured in a variety of ways, which included blood pressure and body mass index measurements.

The study found that low-income Latino parents were less likely than white or black parents to feel that their lives are uncontrollable and overwhelming. They also reported less stress from major life events.

Related Links:
“Study of Young Parents Highlights Links Among Stress, Poverty and Ethnicity,” UCLA Newsroom.

New Jersey Schools Accused of “Apartheid” in Report

A new report takes aim at New Jersey’s public schools, describing the segregation of black and Latino students into certain schools as an “apartheid” system.

The Institute on Education Law and Policy at Rutgers University released the report making that characterization, along with another report issued by the Civil Rights Project at UCLA on segregation in New Jersey schools.

The Record (NorthJersey.com) reports that the Rutgers report found that 13 percent of Hispanic students attend schools where 1 percent or less of students are white, and that an additional 29 percent of Latinos attend schools where 10 percent or fewer of students are white. Students also experience double segregation because of separation by poverty (and for Hispanics, even triple, when language is involved.)

The study notes that New Jersey became one of the first states to bar racially segregated schooling by race, in 1881, and then barred segregation in public schools in 1947. But that doesn’t mean that residential segregation doesn’t still persist.

Attorney Paul Trachtenberg, who brought many education civil rights cases before the New Jersey Supreme Court, led the Rutgers study and decided to use the controversial terminology.

“I find it extremely depressing that New Jersey has what I believe is the strongest state constitution requiring racial balance in the schools, and we have done pretty much zero with that,” he told the Record.

The report suggests integration strategies such as school district mergers, more magnet schools, diversity goals for charter schools, and allowing students to transfer from one public school system to another.

Trachtenberg was an attorney in the years-long Abbott v. Burke case, which has resulted in allocating more funding to poor districts and preschool programs in poorer districts.

Experts do credit that case for improving funding for poorer districts. But money is not a remedy for segregation.

“On the one hand, New Jersey is at the forefront of equity because of the Abbott case,” Richard Kahlenberg of The Century Foundation told the newspaper. “More than any other state, it has poured enormous resources into high-poverty schools. But there is this huge issue of economic segregation that New Jersey has yet to address.”

The Civil Rights Project points out that not all the news is negative, and that the number of diverse schools is rising.

Related Links:

“Rutgers Study Compares Racial Divide in N.J. Schools to ‘Apartheid,'” NJ.com

– “A Status Quo of Segregation: Racial and Economic Imbalance in New Jersey Schools, 1989-2010,” Civil Rights Project/Institute on Education Law and Policy.

Latino Preschoolers Show Social Strengths

Latino children may tend to begin preschool with a smaller vocabulary than white children, but some researchers say that doesn’t necessarily mean they lack social and emotional skills.

Part of that could possibly be traced back to the often warm and nurturing home environments that they come from. NPR reporter Claudio Sanchez recently reported on a University of California, Berkeley, and UCLA study  that examined 4,700 Latino children when they were between the ages of two and five years old.

“We found that Latino kids bring to school strong emotional skills and strong social skills, which means they know how to share with their peers,” said Claudia Galindo, a sociologist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the report‘s findings. “They know how to follow instructions. They know how to listen. And one other thing that we found is that these kids are being raised in very supportive and warm family environments.”

Bruce Fuller, one of the authors and an education professor at the University of California, Berkeley, said that it’s a mistake to view Latino children as slow or deficient. Education policy-makers mistakenly believe that the issue is “we need to fix the parenting skills,” he told NPR

In a commentary piece in The Next America written by study authors Fuller, Galindo and Alma Guerrero, the three described the childrens’ strengths. They observed that Mexican-American kindergartners “display robust cooperative skills, respect adults, and eagerly participate in classroom tasks, whether their behavior is judged by parents or teachers.”

Despite the parents’ nurturing skills, the children lagged. The researchers noted that Mexican mothers did not read as often to their children, which held back the children’s language and cognitive skills.

Related Links:

– “Study: Latino Children Make Up for Academic Shortcomings with Strong Social Skills,” NPR.

– “Study: Mexican American Children Don’t Lag in Social Skills,” Latino Ed Beat.

– “Opinion: Mexican-American Kids Have Better Social Skills, Misunderstood by Institution,” National Journal, The Next America.

– “Mexican American toddlers lag in pre-literacy skills, but not in their social skills, new study shows,” UC Berkeley News Center.

‘National Dream University’ to Serve Undocumented Students

The new California-based “National Dream University” program will offer undocumented immigrant students the ability to study online for a labor studies certificate while awaiting passage of the Dream Act.

The one-year program is being offered by the University of California,Los Angeles, Center for Labor Research and Education and the National Labor College. It will launch in January 2013 and will cost $2,490.

While some states offer in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants, the majority do not and the high cost of a college education deters many young people from pursuing higher education.

UCLA labor center director Kent Wong told Inside Higher Ed that he hopes academics at other universities will pursue similar initiatives. “I hope that this will encourage other faculty to get involved in ways to pressure their states and pressure the federal government to make changes so that these young people can receive the access to higher education which they need and which they deserve,” he said.

On a similar note, after Georgia banned undocumented students from attending some state institutions,  University of Georgia faculty members created Freedom University. The non-credit courses are offered for free to undocumented students.

It’s certainly a well-intentioned effort. But do you think these certificates will be that helpful to these students?

Related Links:

– National Dream University

– “Undocumented, But Not Uneducated.” Inside Higher Ed. 

– “DREAM Act College: UCLA professors create National Dream University, online school for undocumented students. The Huffington Post. 

– Freedom University.

– “Repository of Resources for Undocumented Students.” The College Board. 

California Community Colleges Have Poor Transfer Rates for Latino, Black Students

Researchers at The Civil Rights Project at UCLA released a trio of studies this month showing that while community colleges are the gateway to higher education for most Latinos and blacks in California, few of those students end up transferring to four-year colleges and earning bachelor’s degrees. According to the studies, about 75 percent of Hispanic students and two-thirds of black students who pursue a higher education in California choose the community college route. Many of those students needed intense remedial courses when they entered the system. In 2010, just 20 percent of transfer students from community colleges to four-year universities were Latino or black.

“Either we make bold changes in the system or we consign the majority of our students of color to a life with few prospects and we condemn the state to a future in decline,” said project co-director Patricia Gandara, in a press release.

Looking at southern California, researchers found that low-performing segregated high schools sent students to community colleges that also largely serve poor, black and Hispanic students and from which few students transferred to four-year institutions. The community colleges with the strongest transfer rates served larger numbers of white, Asian and middle class students.

Researchers recommended that:

  • dual enrollment programs be promoted to high school students;
  • the transfer process be streamlined with a statewide articulation agreement;
  • successful colleges be recognized and rewarded;
  •  students be informed about the most successful programs;
  • and funding be increased.

The researchers also proposed that the strongest community colleges be given authority to award bachelor’s degrees.

According to the press release, among the community colleges that have been successful with minority and low-income students:

“The study finds that a core of personnel in these colleges have lived the experiences of these students and dedicated themselves to the goal of transferring them… To a great extent, these staff rely on the college’s outreach efforts to prepare the students even before they arrive on the campus.”

Community colleges are seen as playing an important role in the educational future of Latinos, given that they’re a more common entry point into higher education than universities. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis just wrote an op-ed for The Huffington Post calling community colleges the frontlines of higher education in America. She was promoting President Obama’s proposed $8 billion Community College to Career Fund, which among other things promotes job-training programs.

Solis writes:

“The first elected office I ever held was as a trustee on the Rio Hondo Community College Board in California. So I know well the value these colleges have for Latinos. In so many ways, they’re a perfect fit. Community colleges are local and flexible. They provide accelerated and translatable degree programs. And they provide training that sets people up for jobs in their community — all at very low costs.”

But by The Civil Rights Project’s assessment, these colleges will need to improve in order to live up to the high expectations. The Los Angeles Times wrote about how the Los Angeles Community College District is trying to address its problems with new programs focused on tutoring and helping students adjust to college.

Even if you don’t live in California, it’s possible for you to examine the transfer rates for community colleges in your state or city.