Webcast: The Game-Changing Stories Behind the Numbers on Latino Education

On May 31, EWA took part in a special webcast to help journalists understand key issues in Latino education as part of the College Board’s — Prepárate conference. If you missed it, you can catch up at the link below:

Educating Latinos: The Game-Changing Stories Behind the Numbers

Panelists:

  • Mark Hugo López from the Pew Hispanic Center
  • Frances Contreras, author, associate professor and director of the Higher Education Program at the University of Washington
  • Alfred Herrera, assistant vice provost for academic partnerships at UCLA and undocumented student advocate
  • Katherine Leal Unmuth, award-winning education journalist, EWA member and blogger at latinoedbeat.org.

Special thanks to Dr. Robert Calabrese at Miami-Dade College for providing the recording.

EWA Teams with College Board, NAHJ for May 31 Webcast on Latino Ed

A special webcast to help journalists understand key issues in Latino education takes place May 31 as part of the College Board’s — Prepárate™: Educating Latinos for the Future of America.

The event is co-hosted by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Education Writers Association.

Join us for

Educating Latinos: The Game-Changing Stories Behind the Numbers

Thursday, May 31, 2012, 6 – 7:30 p.m. Eastern

View the webcast at www.latinoedbeat.org

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Coping With ‘Sea Change’ in Chicago Suburbs

Catalyst Chicago looks at the curriculum and budget challenges arising from an ELL boom in the city’s suburbs:

Since 2005, a quarter of suburban school districts have seen their numbers of English-language learners double. In Plainfield School District 202, they have tripled.

Suburban districts are trying out different strategies, with varying degrees of success, to help these students become proficient in English and also teach higher-level academic content. Plainfield School District 202, for example, still hasn’t trained all of its teachers in its middle-grades strategy. And many districts still have difficulty finding certified bilingual teachers, although the long-standing statewide shortage has eased in recent years.